Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson

Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson

I’ve spent this year reading books that I normally wouldn’t even think about reading for a change of pace, and this one did not disappoint! Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson is a thriller about Christine, a woman who has a fictional type of amnesia where she cannot retain short-term memory. The book had my heart pounding with each new discovery, and I was rooting for Christine to find out who she was and what truly happened to her. watching in disbelief as Christine wonders who could she trust in her inner circle since she couldn’t recall anyone.

All About Me!: My Remarkable Life in Show Business by Mel Brooks

All About Me!: My Remarkable Life in Show Business by Mel Brooks

In need of a humorous feel-good book? I highly recommend “All About Me” by Mel Brooks! I also recommend that you listen & read it-as Mel narrates it and the book provides photos. I listened to this while I was walking and found myself laughing out loud. I am sure all that walked past me wondered what I was listening to-ha!  Mel Brooks is more than meets the eye by the way. Did you know that Mel, 95 years old, was taught military engineering skills at the Virginia Military Institute and served as a corporal in the 1104th Engineer combat Battalion,

The Last Cuentista by Donna Barba Higuera

The Last Cuentista by Donna Barba Higuera

It’s 2061, and a comet is about to hit Earth, wiping out the world’s population and making the planet inhabitable. Only a privileged few get the opportunity to go to space and live on a new planet. Twelve-year-old Petra Peña and her family are given this rare opportunity because her parents are scientists who will be able to help make the new planet habitable for humans. The catch is that getting to the new planet, Sagan, will take 380 years, so Petra, her brother Javier, her parents, and the many other passengers on the ship will be put in a

Magical Boy: A Graphic Novel Vol. 1 by The Kao

Magical Boy: A Graphic Novel Vol. 1 by The Kao

Max is a biracial (White and Japanese) transgender teen boy who is learning how to grow into himself and is facing struggles with school, home, and the fact that he now has magical powers.  Max’s trusted friend Jen is the only one who knows that Max is a boy at the novel’s beginning.  Max decides to come out to his mom and dad on his 16th birthday, but his mother can’t accept the fact that her little goddess wants to transition since they are descended from the Goddess of Light, Aurora.  Max’s powers transform him into an uncomfortable frilly dress

Ada and the Galaxies by Alan Lightman and Olga Pastuchiv, illustrated by Susanna Chapman

Ada and the Galaxies by Alan Lightman and Olga Pastuchiv, illustrated by Susanna Chapman

Ada and the Galaxies follows an inquisitive little girl named Ada who loves the stars so much that couldn’t wait to go to her grandparents’ home in Maine where she would be able to see them. During her long day of waiting to see the stars, Ada was able to see many things that she wouldn’t normally see, since she lived in a city. When night fell, so did the fog, and Ada was so worried that she wouldn’t be able to see the stars. To help pass the time, Ada’s grandfather, Poobah, showed Ada a special book of photographs taken by the

The Suicide Squad (Movie Review) written and directed by James Gunn

The Suicide Squad (Movie Review) written and directed by James Gunn

The Suicide Squad is a really good superhero comedy. The cast is great; as always, Margot Robbie is great as Harley Quinn, and Jon Cena makes for a great addition to the DC Extended Universe as Peacemaker. The fighting sequences are very well choreographed, kind of like Birds of Prey (also starring Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn). I had never seen the original, not-so-well-received Suicide Squad from 2016, but this was still awesome. James Gunn killed it with his usual humor and action that superhero fans can recognize from his other movies, like Guardians of the Galaxy. Overall, The Suicide

Black Widow (Movie Review) directed by Cate Shortland

Black Widow (Movie Review) directed by Cate Shortland

Black Widow takes place in between the appearances made by Natasha Romanoff AKA Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) in Captain America: Civil War and Avengers: Infinity War. Fans of the character who haven’t seen Black Widow yet may likely jump to conclusions stating that it’s not an origin story. However, while Black Widow may take place after several other movies that the character has already appeared in, it does bring her back to her troubled past, as well as introducing her family to the audience. I LOVE the opening sequence. Right away, it told me that this is not your typical

Opioid, Indiana by Brian Allen Carr

Opioid, Indiana by Brian Allen Carr

Opioid, Indiana is the heart-wrenching story of Riggle, a grief stricken 17 year old from the border of Texas who finds himself trying to acclimate to the weather and culture change of moving to rural Indiana. Having nowhere else to turn, he finds he has to navigate the hardships of the rural drug culture. Along his travels, Riggle is fortunate enough to find a great best friend who showed him kindness and that he wasn’t alone on this Earth.  Riggle embarks upon on a hero’s adventure to find his addict uncle to avoid being put in a state home for orphans,

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

In this alternate, fantastical history, witches are real. Or, they were real. Now, women’s ability to do witching has been made illegal for women. While women can do magic, it is frowned upon, and the only thing they are allowed to do is little charms to help themselves with “women’s” or household work. In 1893, James Juniper is on the run and ends up in New Salem, where her estranged sisters Beatrice Belladona and Agnes Amaranth reside (and yes, there is a reason for those names!). She soon finds a purpose and joins the local women’s rights movement – first

Me (Moth) by Amber McBride

Me (Moth) by Amber McBride

Me (Moth) is a beautifully written book that flows so elegantly. Amber McBride grabs your attention straight away from the first page through the end, tugging at all your feelings throughout the whole book. This petite book is a great example of a novel-in-verse and Amber McBride is a virtuoso at it. Even if you are not into poetry or written verse, this would be a great way to test it out, and the story won’t fail to keep you engrossed. Me (Moth) follows two teens learning about life, love, death, racism and their history. I don’t want to spoil

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